Cuisine authenique Gourmet Cookware


Cookware Basics

Pan Cooking Techniques

Sautè

Sautèing uses a small amount of oil over relatively high heat. Ingredients are usually cut into pieces or thinly sliced. Food that is sautèed is browned hile preserving its texture, moisture and flavor. Sautè pans typically have straight, vertical sides.

Lightly coat the bottom of the pan and spread food, cut into little pieces, across the hot oil and let it brown, turning and tossing frequently for even cooking.

Deglazing or fond.

Pan fry to form a deposit of browned sugars, carbohydrates, and proteins on the bottom of the pan. Now add water and broth and scrape the bottom to make a thick sauce. The fond or "foundation" sauce is perfect to flavor sauces, soups, and gravies. This method is the cornerstone of many well-known sauces and gravies. The sauce can be simmered down with a steady heat to form a rich, concentrated reduction.

Stir Fry

Cook food quickly on a very hot pan with very little oil while stirring. Helps keep food crunchy and preserves nutrients. Allows surfaces to get browned.

Deep Fry.

Creates a crispy golder brown crust and a soft, moist interior. But is messy and generally unhealthy.

Steam

Steam preserves vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants because of the lower heat. It is good for vegetables.

Heat Techniques

Gas

Easy to reduce or increase temperature.

Electric

Temperature changes slowly.

Induction -Magnetic cooking

You will need a steel induction interface disk under the copper pan.

Microwave

Great for reheating food.

Cooking Temperature

        Most foods cook well at medium high.

        Lower temperature after adding food.

        Temperature setting for copper pans is 15% lower than usual.

Oil temperatures

        Try to cook at lower temperatures and minimize the amount of oil.

        Avoid deep frying.

        If possible soak excess oil from the food with a paper towel.

        Do not reuse frying oil.

Smoke Points

When you heat oil beyond its smoke point, the fat begins to break down and releases free radicals and acrolein.

Type of Fat

Smoke Point

 

Safflower Oil

510°F

265°C

Refined Olive Oil

465°F

240°C

Vegetable Oils

 

 

Corn, Soybean , Peanut, Sunflower

450°F

230°C

Clarified Butter

450°F

230°C

Canola, Rapeseed Oil

400°F

205°C

Vegetable Shortening

360°F

180°C

Sesame Oil

350-410°F

175-210°C

Butter

350°F

175°C

Coconut Oil

350°F

175°C

Extra-Virgin Olive Oil

325-375°F

165-190°C

        Saturated fats ( butter) are solid at room temperature. High consumption is considered unhealthy.

        Polyunsaturated Fats (canola oil) are liquid at room temperature. They are considered healthy but are not so great for cooking.

        Monounsaturated Fats (olive oil, peanut oil) are healthier and are considered best for frying and sautèing.

Corn oil and sunflower are rich in polyunsaturates but generate high levels of aldehydes at high temperature. Consuming or inhaling aldehydes, even in small amounts, has been linked to increased risk of heart disease and cancer.

Olive oil and cold-pressed rapeseed undergo very little oxidation at higher temperatures.

Butter and lard are not as bad as we may think.

Type of oil or fat

Polyunsaturated (%)

Monounsaturated (%)

Saturated (%)

Coconut oil

2

6

86

Butter

3

21

51

Lard

11

45

39

Olive oil

10

76

14

Rapeseed oil

28

63

7

Sesame oil

41

40

14

Corn oil

54

27

12

Sunflower oil

65

20

10

-from bbc.com

Design and size Shapes

Diameter Size of Pan

       11" is ideal for 2 to 4 people.

       10" too small, 12: too large, 11" ideal

       Most large range burners are 8"

       11" is easy to clean - will fit in most sinks.

Thickness

A 3.5mm thick pan optimizes heat conductivity, capacity, and weight.

Fry pans

       Shorter sloped sides.

       Allows steam to disperse for crisp surfaces.

       Quickly fry food with minimal fat.

       The Fry pan is a versatile general purpose skillet. The sloped sides are shallow and ideal for pan frying while stirring.

       The pan is well balanced and with practice you could flip pancakes.

       This is the most often used kitchen tool.

Sautè pans

       The Saute pan has straight deep sides and can hold a large amount of ingredients.

       It is ideal for simmering and making sauces.

       The steel lid fits snugly.

       It is oven safe.

Pots

       Ideal for soups, stews.